What is Psoriasis?

Photo of psoriasis symptoms.Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin condition that produces plaques of thickened, scaling skin. The dry scales are thought to result from the rapid proliferation of skin cells triggered by the release of inflammatory chemicals from abnormal blood lymphocytes. Psoriasis commonly affects the skin of the elbows, knees, and scalp. Some people have such mild psoriasis that they may not even suspect that they have a medical skin condition. Others have very severe psoriasis involving their entire body. Psoriasis is an incurable, long-term (chronic) skin condition. It has a variable course, periodically improving and worsening. It is not unusual for psoriasis to spontaneously clear for years and stay in remission. Many people note a worsening of their symptoms in the colder winter months.

Psoriasis affects all races and both sexes. Although psoriasis can be seen in people of any age, from babies to seniors, most commonly patients are first diagnosed in their early adult years. The quality of life of patients with psoriasis is often diminished because of the appearance of their skin. Recently, it has become clear that people with psoriasis are more likely to have diabetes, high blood lipids, heart disease and arthritis. Caring for psoriasis takes medical teamwork. 

What are causes and risk factors of psoriasis?

The exact cause remains unknown. There may be a combination of risk factors, including genetic predisposition and environmental factors. It is common for psoriasis to be found in members of the same family. Defects in the immune system are thought to play a major role. Despite research over the past 30 years looking at many triggers, the “master switch” that turns on psoriasis is still a mystery.

What are psoriasis symptoms and signs? What does psoriasis look like?

Psoriasis appears as red or pink areas of thickened, raised, and scaling skin. It classically affects skin over the elbows, knees, and scalp. Although any area of the body may be involved, it tends to be more common in areas of friction, trauma, or rubbing. Psoriasis may appear in several different forms, including psoriasis vulgaris (plaques), guttate psoriasis (small, drop-like spots), inverse psoriasis (in the folds like of the underarms, navel, groin, and buttocks), and pustular psoriasis (small pus-filled yellowish blisters). When the palms and the soles are involved, this is known as palmoplantar psoriasis. Sometimes pulling off one of these small dry white flakes of skin causes a tiny blood spot on the skin. This is medically referred to as a special diagnostic sign in psoriasis called the Auspitz sign. Genital lesions, especially on the head of the penis, are common. Psoriasis in moist areas like the navel or the area between the buttocks (intergluteal folds) may look like flat red patches. This may be confused with other skin conditions like fungal infections, yeast infections, skin irritation, or bacterial infections. Fingernails and toenails often exhibit small pits (pinpoint depressions), yellowish-brown separations of the tip of the nail, and a brownish discoloration of the nail bed called an “oil spot.” Nail psoriasis may be confused with and incorrectly diagnosed as a fungal nail infection. Scalp psoriasis may look like severe dandruff with dry flakes and red areas of skin. It may be difficult to differentiate between scalp psoriasis and seborrhea when only the scalp is involved. However, the treatment is often very similar for both conditions.

Can psoriasis affect only my nails?

Yes, psoriasis may involve solely the nails in a limited number of patients. Usually, the nail signs accompany the skin and arthritis symptoms. Nail psoriasis is typically very difficult to treat. Treatment options are somewhat limited and include potent topical steroids applied at the nail-base cuticle, injection of steroids at the nail-base cuticle, and oral or systemic medications as described below for the treatment of psoriasis.

Can psoriasis affect my joints?

Yes, psoriasis is associated with joint problems in about 10%-35% of patients. In fact, sometimes joint pains may be the only sign of the disorder with completely clear skin. The joint disease associated with psoriasis is referred to as psoriatic arthritis. Patients may have inflammation of any joints (arthritis), although the joints of the hands, knees, and ankles tend to be most commonly affected. Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory, destructive form of arthritis and is treated with medications to stop the disease progression. The average age for onset of psoriatic arthritis is 30-40 years of age. In most cases, the skin symptoms occur before the onset of the arthritis.

How do health-care professionals diagnose psoriasis?

The diagnosis of psoriasis is typically made by integrating the physical examination with the medical history and relevant family history. Sometimes, lab tests, including a microscopic examination of a skin biopsy, and X-rays may necessary.

How many people have psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a fairly common skin condition and is estimated to affect approximately 1%-3% of the U.S. population. It currently affects roughly 7.5 million to 8.5 million people in the U.S. It is seen worldwide in about 125 million people. Interestingly, African Americans have about half the rate of psoriasis as Caucasians.

Is there a cure for psoriasis?

No, psoriasis is not currently curable. However, it can go into remission and show no signs of disease. Ongoing research is actively making progress on finding better treatments and a possible cure in the future.

Is psoriasis contagious?

No. Research studies have not shown it to be contagious from person to person. You cannot catch it from anyone, and you cannot pass it to anyone. You can directly touch someone with psoriasis every day and never catch the skin condition.

Is psoriasis hereditary?

Yes, it is possible. Although psoriasis is not contagious from person to person, there is a known genetic tendency, and it may be inherited by the offspring of affected parents. Therefore family history is very helpful in making the diagnosis.

What kind of doctor treats psoriasis?

Dermatologists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis, and rheumatologists specialize in the treatment of joint disorders and psoriatic arthritis. Many kinds of physicians may treat psoriasis, including dermatologists, family physicians, internal medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and other medical doctors. Because of its chronicity, patients may seek help from acupuncturists, holistic practitioners, chiropractors, and nutritionists. It is now apparent that patients with psoriasis are prone to cardiovascular disease. It is very important for all patients with psoriasis to be monitored for heart and blood vessel disease. The American Academy of Dermatology and the National Psoriasis Foundation are excellent sources to help find physicians who specialize in this disease. Not all dermatologists and rheumatologists treat psoriasis. The National Psoriasis Foundation has one of the most up-to-date databases of current psoriasis specialists.

Para malabanan ang Psoriasis, una gumamit ng DXN aloe vera products para maging makinis ang balat, pangalawa gumamit ng DXN BEE POLLEN na mayaman sa Vitamins A,D, at E na syang nagbabata sa balat, at pangatlo gumamit ng RGGL 2 Pares araw-araw para mapigilan, at maiwasto ang maling takbo ng immune system.

RG ganocelium beepollen aloev1

-Hiram at hango sa ulat ng American Psoriasis Foundation
Other source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s